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from some indicated is getting worse. security remain weak. in april, there was only one u.s. diplomatic security agents stationed there. we also struggled to obtain additional personnel. but we were never able to obtain the numbers we were comfortable with. lou: all of this will be analyzed and checked by our experts tonight. the latest from the campaign trail that is winding its way quickly to election day. congressman ryan's big night, the vice president as well, with us tonight is senator ron johnson, strong supporter of wisconsinite, it is all unfolding the way that the producer blockbuster of 2016. dinesh d'souza with us. affirmative action, back before the supreme court. the high court heard arguments today as to whether we can be a colorblind society. shannon bream was there. we will have the report for us coming out. the administration isn't reeling. a president seemingly off-balance. governor romney has taken a slight overall lead in national polls and the president seems to be criticized almost as vigorously by his friends is by governor romney. now we learn the de
. also in the program, the u.s. congress bars to build chinese telecom companies from takeovers or mergers. it's as there are security threats. a warning on afghanistan's future. in the report forecasts collapse and even civil war after foreign forces have left. it's midday in london, 7:00 in the evening in beijing, 7:30 in the morning in caracas. hugo chavez has extended his 14- year grip on power in venezuela. the vote was his narrowest victory, but it gives him another six-year term to continue venezuela's socialist revolution. his victory may irritate his detractors in washington and elsewhere. the votes pit the president against the young candidate henrique capriles, who vowed to open the country to private investment. now this report from caracas. >> this had been billed as a tight race. but the results came quickly in the end after the final polling stations had closed and gave hugo chavez a 10-point lead. >> to those who promote hate and social poison and those always drawn to deny all the good things that happen in venezuela, i invite them to dialogue, debate, and to wo
there on the market. so they are using citigroup to run their sale, and what they are looking for is second round offers. they already have offers to be taken private by a few names, by blackstone, carlisle group, and silver lake management. we will continue to watch what happens here with all script and drx is the ticker. you can see -- mdrx is the ticker. you can see it is up. connell: the unemployment rate surprisingly dropped to 7.8% last month. there's been all this talk since then on whether it was a real number, which it is. the report revealed there are still some real employment problems in the country that need to be fixed. let's talk about with former chairman of the council of economic advisors under president clinton. he joins us from d.c. right now. on this show we have dismissed this idea of conspiracy, this number somehow fudged, no evidence to support that at all. in talking about that, we missed the fact the so-called real unemployment rate includes people who are discouraged, that stayed 14.7%, not good, fewer private sector jobs than forecast were added last month. again, not
news" with brian williams. >>> good evening. they now estimate over 67 million of us watched the debate in denver last night and what people saw was a highly energized, motivated and combative mitt romney sharing the stage with a subdued and lackluster president obama. what they saw was mitt romney on his way over the course of 90 minutes to scoring a clear and consensus victory in what will be the first of three meetings. between these two men. for romney, today felt like a new chapter. here's a look at the crowd waiting for him tonight in virginia. while the president today said some things he was expected to say on that stage last night. we begin our coverage with nbc's andrea mitchell. andrea, good evening. >> good evening, brian. the president showed up today armed with attack lines against mitt romney a day late. trying to regain his footing after a rocky debate performance, the president today at an outdoor rally seemed everything he was not last night. >> the man on stage last night, he does not want to be held accountable for the real mitt romney's decisions and what he's been
between the u.s., russia and syria. a pal discuss the syrian support of the -- a panel discusses russian support of the syrian civil war. this is about an hour and a half. >> we welcome all of you joining us on heritage foundation and on c-span. we ask that you turn off yourself funds as we begin recording for the benefit of today's program. the we will post for everyone's future reference. hosting our discussion today is dr. steven bucci. his focus is special operations and cyber security. he commanded the third battalion fifth special forces and also became the military assistant to donald rumsfeld. at his retirement, -- prior to joining us, he was a leading consultant on cyber security. please welcome the in -- join me in welcoming steven bucci. [applause] >> we have a very timely subjects to discuss, and i think we have a great panel of experts that will be doing be discussing to get us started. i have been interested in this because one of the first things i did was testified before congress about the weapons of mass destruction threat that syria and the somewhat untimely demise mig
and general jim jones. >> i quite agree that my judgment is that much of the world wants u.s. leadership, they don't feel comfortable without it, but they no longer react to any dictatorial or any due toarls from us. they want to participate but they also want to be listened to. >> i am not even sure where the word leader hip is a good word to describe the role americ should play in the world. we should be playing the stilizg role. wehoulbe organizing our coalitions, we should be a source of stability, but when we talk about leadership, too many people think of the iraq and 2003, which was a fatally bad exercise of leadership. >> rose: we conclude this evening with dexter filkins of the new yorker magazine who has a remarkable story about death in iraq and reunion in the united states. >> the i interviewed a guy in the peace, a psychiatrist who used the term moral injury and he sa a t of soiers a marines stuff from moral injury, which he described as sort of it happens when you get an order, you do something that you believe at the time was absolutely correct and the only thing you could
for you? >> i think they could decide the election for either one of us. look, we're basically in a tie, the president and i are. he's been president for four years, has outspent me massively in this campaign and yet he's still at a tie. and so the debates could well decide it one way or the other, i don't know. they may not have a lot of fireworks go off and perhaps they don't change things very much, but we're on track to win this. >> pelley: you know, in the debate you could get asked anything and i wonder, how do you prepare for that? >> well, i've been asked almost everything already. ( laughs ) and so my guess is i'll get-- i'll get some questions i haven't expected but i know where i stand. i know why i'm running. i'm concerned about america. i'm concerned about the direction america has been put in. >> pelley: do you study films of the president's debates, past debates? i wonder how you get ready for that kind of thing? >> i talk about issues with my policy team. we talk about some of the more obscure issues that i don't get asked about from time to time, go through those, look
that will play in the future. this is about ten minutes. >> good evening. welcome and thank you for joining us here. my name is richard fontaine the president for the center of new american security. it's a pleasure to welcome you to celebrate publication of the look of the revenge of geography with the map tells us about conflicts and the state. i've heard it said before that you honor agreed author not by reading his books but by buying them. you will be happy to know books can be sold after the conversation on the stage in this room. bob kaplan's work is well known to many in the audience he's been a fellow at cnas and a correspondent for atlantic for about a quarter of the century and is currently the chief geopolitical analyst. i became acquainted with his riding through the book arabist which is a group of westerners living and working in the middle east. since that book, the title of the work, the coming anarchy, imperial grounds have provoked intense debate in policy circles. the most recent book monsoon and the future of american power has become required reading by those that interes
joins us with the latest from both camps. also tonight, hope for malala. the pakistani school girl clinging to life after the taliban shot her at close range. doctors see some promising signs. elizabeth palmer reports from pakistan. lessons learned on the battle fields of iraq and afghanistan are saving lives here at home. bob orr with that story. >> it's awesome. it's so big, too. i can't believe it's going down the street. >> axelrod: and mission improbable-- a space shuttle inching along the streets of los angeles on its final mission. ben tracy takes us along for the ride. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news." >> axelrod: good evening. i'm jim axelrod. in 24 days, americans will elect a president. according to the latest national gallup poll, mitt romney now leads barack obama by two points, 49 to 47, a statistical dead heat. the state of the race has been shaken up in the last 10 days since the first presidential debate. look at florida, ape crucial state for both men. a poll by two of the state's largest newspapers has governor romney up by seven points,
forward. mayor lee -- i also have the director of hud here and he is going to lead us and then we will have mayor lee up in a moment. >> thank you very much and it really is a privilege to be here with you today and to build on henry's comments and it's extraordinary that the grants across the country that were awarded to hud two of them are in the same state and it's more extraordinary that both of them are in the same city, san francisco so congratulations. [cheers and applause] so for context i just want to mention a few things and this is no news to all of you here in the room and the people standing up with me today, but today in america more than 10 million people are living in neighborhoods of concentrated poverty and limited investment and opportunities for themselves and their children, and we know that one of the most important factors in determining the economic and financial success of peoples whether or not a child grows up in those high poverty neighborhoods? a. the fact that we can predict health, education outcomes of children based on the zip code, where they live
't have independent confirmation of that. but it's fairly likely, because the turks said they were using radar to pinpoint the sources of fire that had fired into turkey. the shelling has continued in the early morning, but we don't know whether it will continue. a lot will depend on that. whether the turks keep up the bombardment or whether they will feel their national honor has been satisfied. the other important thing to watch is for any kind of syrian reaction. they have not mention any casualties and their tone so far has been conciliatory, saying there is an investigation under way in syria as to how the fire went across the border into syria and extending condolences to the families of the turkish victims. >> it is a no-nonsense response. just in terms of the domestic realities for turkey and for the turkish government and the position they find themselves in , presumably, they would want to stop this. >> certainly, they don't want to get embroiled in a bilateral fight with the syrian regime on the ground. that has been clear from the beginning. there is a concerted nato division
without further delay, we'll go now to the moderator, bob schieffer, who will be leading us through tonight's debate. >> good evening from the campus of lynn university here in boca raton, florida. this is the fourth and last debate of the 2012 campaign brought to you by the commission on presidential debates. this one's on foreign policy. i'm bob schieffer of cbs news. the questions are mine, and i have not shared them with the candidates or their aides. the audience has taken a vow of silence. no applause, no reaction of any kind except right now when we welcome president barack obama and governor mitt romney. >> it's good to see you again. >> good luck. good luck. >> gentlemen, your campaigns have agreed to certain rules, and they are simple. they've asked me to divide the evening into segments. i'll pose a question at the beginning of each segment. you will each have two minutes to respond, and then we will have a general discussion until we move to the next segment. tonight's debate, as both of you know, comes on the 50th anniversary of the night that president kennedy told the
a few seconds. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks will be watching with us here in the studio, along with our colleague jeffrey brown, newshour political editor christina bellantoni, and presidential historian michael beschloss. we'll hear from all of them after the debate, when we'll also be joined by ari shapiro and scott horsley of npr. they are at lynn university. >> ifill: we're also streaming the debate online and offering additional content on our live blog. >> woodruff: and here now is tonight's moderator, bob schieffer of cbs news. from the campus of lynn university here in boca raton, florida. this is the fourth and last debate of the 2012 campaign brought to you by the commission on presidential debates. this one is on foreign policy. i'm bob schieffer of cbs news. the questions are mine. and i have not shared them with the candidates or their aides. the audience has taken a vow of silence. no applause, no reaction of any kind except right now when we welcome president barack obama and governor mitt romney. (applause) >> thank you. >> thank you, good to see you agai
frequently on numerous media outlets and has written for quite a few of the major u.s. newspapers in the area or in these areas of his expertise. he is extremely knowledgeable man who has seen things happen and comments on them in, okay, in my humble opinion in a very reasonable and accurate way. he'll be followed by dr. robert freedman who is the peggy mire how far pearlstone professor of political science at baltimore hebrew university and visiting professor of science at johns hopkins university. he has been a consultant to both the u.s. department of state and the central intelligence agency, and he is the author of four books on soviet foreign policy and is also the editor, has been the editor of 14 books on israel and middle eastern policy. and then our third speaker will be dr. stephen blank, he is the strategic study institute's expert on soviet bloc and post-soviet world since 1989. he is the editor of imperial decline: russia's changing position in asia and co-editor of "the soviet military in the future." and he will -- the last speaker is dr. ariel cohen, my colleague here at heri
manufacturer in the world. it used to be the united states of america. >> governor, you're the last person who will get tough on china. >> we have iran four years closer to a nuclear bomb. >> when folks go after americans, we go after them. campaign 2012, a presidential debate. from boca raton, florida, here is scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening, it was 50 years ago tonight that president john f. kennedy went on national television to announce that the soviet union had set up missile sites in cuba and he demanded that they be removed. the world was on the brink of nuclear war. it is a reminder of the kind of crisis a commander-in-chief can face. and it comes as as the candidates for president hold their final debate tonight, focusing on foreign policy. with the race still very tight, both president obama and mitt romney have a lot to gain and a lot to lose in their final joint appearance before a national audience. it might be their last best chance to win over the uncommitted voters who will decide the election, which is now just two weeks away. for tonight's debate, the candidates will be
>> maybe. i don't know. thanks for inviting us into your home. that's it for this special report. fair, balanced and unafraid. >> shep: this is the fox report. tonight mitt romney launch has critique on president obama's foreign policy and one prominent national poll shows there is a new leader in the race for the white house. plus, the most expensive gas in all the country. a new all-time high. >> in a weeks it was 50 cents up. >> shep: one senator calling for a federal investigation. and an historic mission. >> three, two, one, and lift-off. >> shep: a new life line for astronauts in outer space. it even delivers ice cream. but first from fox this monday night, governor mitt romney says america is facing more threats tonight than when president obama took office. the republican nominee for the presidency accusing our current president of leading from behind, saying and i quote, hope is not a strategy. governor romney went after the president on foreign policy today in a speech at the virginia military institute. >> i believe that if america doesn't lead, others will. others who
you to lynn university for welcoming us here and mr. president, it's good to be with you again. we were together at a humanous event earlier and it's nice to maybe be funny this time not on purpose. we'll see what happens. this is obviously an area of great concern to the entire world and to america in particular, which is to see a complete change in the structure and the environment in the middle east. with the arab spring came a great deal of hope that there would be a change towards more moderation, an opportunity for greater participation on the part of women and public life and in economic life in the middle east, but instead we've seen in nation after nation a number of disturbing events. of course, we see in syria 30,000 civilians being killed by the military there. we see in libya an attack apparently by i think we now know by terrorists of some kind against our people there, four people dead, our hearts and minds go to them. mali has been taken over, the northern part by al qaeda-type individuals. we have in egypt a muslim brotherhood president and so what we're seeing can
from college students, 225-85-3883. also remember you can send us your tweet at twitter.com or post your comments on facebook, facebok.com/csan and send an e-mail journal@c-span.org. we will try to read those in the first 45 minutes as well. here is a wall street journal story -- excuse me, "the washington times" story on the supreme court consideration of racial quotas and they say this a little bit we hear that about that 2003 case the "the washington times" reports they shut down the seattle system that divided the city's elementary schools equally along racial lines to justice john roberts wrote the majority opinion called the meds extreme. in 2009 the court ruled that new haven connecticut violated the civil rights five-year fighters after the results of a promotion exam because not enough blacks had passed. with liberal leaning justice elena kagan reducing herself a key vote could apply again with justice anthony kennedy as we heard from adam. sandy a democrat. what do you think? >> caller: yes. >> host: what do you think of affirmative action in this case specifically for the
it should be something to watch from danville, kentucky. thanks for inviting us in. that's it for this "special report," as always, fair, balanced and unafraid. "special report" on-line and we have a lot to talk about tonight and it starts in four seconds. >> shep: this is the fox report. breaking to me, a massive security breach in a college in florida. hackers stealing hundreds of thousands of confidential records. plus, more questions about the state of security. in libya, the day terrorists murdered our ambassador. >>> a former security commander in libya says the consulate did not have enough protection. >> attacks were on the increase. in june, the ambassador received a threat on facebook. >> after acquiring the compound we made a number of security upgrades. >> now the state department confirms the attack did not start out as a protest as u.s. officials originally claimed. >> it was a spontaneous reaction to what had just transfired in cairo. >> certainly we're going to get to the bottom of ambassador rice's false statement. >> if any administration official, inclu
the attack in libya that killed four americans, including our u.s. ambassador, a masked gunman was murdered, has murdered a security official who worked for the u.s. embassy in yemen. that is all ahead unless breaking news changes everything. >> first from fox at 3:00 in kentucky, we are live waiting for the debate. it and high 60's, the fall leaves are out and the drive from here to lexington, it is the "thrill in the villa," they made that up. our slogan people are better, a showdown between the current v.p. and the man would would like to take his job, congressman paul ryan. the stakes are higher than usual coming after the poll that show an increasingly close race much vice president biden is clearly a seasoned debater, doing it since he was a kid. tonight, under pressure to turn things around after president obama's first debate performance or lack thereof. congressman ryan looking to boost the romney campaign's recent rise in the polls tonight. the debates are not usually game changers but analysts say this year could be an exception. carl cameron is fouling the presidential candidate
on the line for us from istanbul. put this incident into perspective for us. what does it mean for to keep's role in the syrian conflict now -- turkey's role in the syrian conflict? >> turkey is getting ever deeper into the syrian conflict. we have the first incident on turkish soil where turkey took action against another state. there was a similar case last year when they stopped an iranian plane on its way to syria. this time, russia is involved. the turkish officials with whom i've been speaking are very eager to play this down, to say that maybe the russians did not know what was on the plane. they will work it out with the russians, so they are very easy not to cause another crisis. >> we understand there is a meeting scheduled for december 3 between the leaders. what do you think this incident will do to relations between russia and turkey? >> i think there will be a crisis, at least in the short term, but i think both sides are interested in good relations. turkey needs russia because it depends on russian gas for its energy supply. russia -- for russia, turkey is very important, s
, everyone. so glad you're with us. i'm randi kaye. we start this morning with the shuttle "endeavour" final journey. a slow, very slow ride through the streets of los angeles that is still not other. remember, we're used to seeing the shuttle going about 17,000 miles per hour but two miles an hour this weekend may have been too ambitious for "endeavour." john zarrella is hanging out watching the crawl. >> reporter: many people have waited eight, nine hours for the shuttle to arrive, but when it did, it was worth it. it had the road to itself, a parade of one. in tinseltown where seeing stars ho-hum, "endeavour" made everyone starry-eyed. cameras snapped. people looked on in awe as "endeavour" came into view. this was the first viewing area outside the old former arena where the los angeles lakers once played. and "endeavour" was way ahead at that point but it wouldn't last. outside the second designated viewing area, some people stood and waited for more than eight hours for it to arrive and when it did, it was well after dark. the most difficult part was more difficult than expected. "ende
. that's what we found. the cost was close to 30 billion u.s. dollars. how we organize, well, we have something similar that you have. we have the national emergency office under the internal affair minister and they have offices in the different counties, in the different places in chile this emergency office request aid directly to the joint chief of staff and joint chief of staff to the army, navy or air force and then we move the pieces to put the aid where they need it. the scenario, the beginning when we face this was the same thing we are talking about in this seminar. the necessity was access because everything was, the delivery was absolutely hampered because of the roads so we have to clean it. water, food, electricity and communications. another need at that time to do that is field hospital generators, housing, sat coms, purifying water systems and mobile bridges. so the force was at the beginning just to distribute the aid and at the end start doing law enforcement when the government declared catastrophe and the president gave us the authority to do that. so we move
a treaty of friendship and cooperation. by 1974, as egypt began to move into the u.s. orbit, syria emerged as the no. 1 ally. not to say there are no problems between the two sides. the syrian intervention in lebanon clearly displeased moscow as did its agreement to security council to hundred 42. it's one of the few states that supported the soviet invasion of afghanistan in 1979 and was richly rewarded with military aid as a result. that continued until the advent of gorbachev in 1985 to turn off the tap of military aid. the chill in the relationship continued until 2005 when a combination of increasing syrian isolation due to policies in lebanon and a much more aggressive russian foreign policy under vladimir putin established a close russian- syrian relationship we see today. let's look at the policies of vladimir putin in his second term. i see is reacting to be setbacks like the school fiasco, the orange revolution in the ukraine, and the increasing vulnerability of the u.s. in the middle east because of the invasion of iraq which -- and because of the revival in the taliban in afgha
for joining us here at the heritage foundation in our claman opportune -- auditorium on our heritage.org web site as well as joining us via c-span today and in the future. we would ask everyone in houston make sure your cell phones have been turned off this week prepare for everyone's benefit in recording of today's program. we will post the program in 24 hours on our heritage web site or everyone's future reference. hosting our discussion today is.there steven bucci with the homeland security in our douglas and sarah allison center for foreign-policy studies. is focuses cybersecurity as well as defense support to civil authorities. dr. bucci served in america for three decades as an army special forces officer and top pentagon official and commanded the third battalion special forces and became military assistant to defense secretary donald rumsfeld in july 2001 and served throughout the secretary's term and his retirement he continued at the pentagon as deputy assistant secretary of defense for homeland defense and america's security affairs. prior to joining us here he was a lead consulta
fear the government is responsible. they use every opportunity to insult us. >> turkey's sunni prime minister called the alawis his -- >> there is only one place for muslims to go and pray. that is the mosque. i don't have anything against their cultural centers. they create divisions in society. >> the idea of men and women dancing together is unimaginable to some muslims. they sing songs and recite poetry while worshiping. their perspective is humanistic and less dogmatic. they worship the son-in-law of the profit mohammad. men and women are symbolically equal, which they show by watching each other's hands. -- washing each other's hands. >> the creator made a man and woman out of a drop of water. if that is how he sough why shouldn't reat them equally? >> for sunnis, such an immense amount to heresy. they generally keep their traditions and songs to themselves. the syrian dictator is part of a related sect. >> if there is a dictatorship, the people should get rid of it. it is not the business of oth cotrieso get involved. we have seen what has happened in the so-called arab spring
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 351 (some duplicates have been removed)